Posts Categorised: Collaboration

A Blueprint for Interagency and Cross-Jurisdictional Data Sharing

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“This blueprint offers practical lessons for launching data sharing, integration, and analysis projects that can better inform crime prevention and reduction strategies, with a focus on spatial analysis. It addresses the major challenges those engaged in data sharing projects will encounter and describes strategies to overcome those challenges. The blueprint also serves as a guide on the spatial-statistical methods that can facilitate cross-sector analysis; new trends in the technology, culture, and practice of data sharing; and the potential for future interagency and cross-jurisdictional data sharing and analyses to inform public safety strategies.”

Source: La Vigne, N. (2017). Urban Institute and available from this link (open access).

Multiagency Investigation & Support Team (MIST) pilot: Evaluation report

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Lapwings/G.Griffin

“It summarises the findings of the evaluation of the Multiagency Investigation and Support Team (MIST), which involves the co-location of a Child Abuse Squad team (WA Police), police and Child Protection and Family Support specialist child interviewers, a CPFS worker, Child and Family Advocates, and therapeutic support services to work as part of an integrated team in Armadale, Western Australia.”

Source: Bromfield, L., & Herbert, J. (2017).  Australian Centre for Child Protection and available from this link (open access).

Offence or defence? Approach and avoid goals in the multi-agency emergency response to a simulated terrorism attack

Windsurfing

“When operating in multiteam settings, it is important that goals are cohesive between team members, especially in high-stakes, risky, and uncertain environments. This study explored goal consistency during a multiteam emergency response simulation. A total of n = 50 commanders from the UK Police Services, Fire and Rescue Services, and Ambulance Services took part in a simulated terrorism exercise, who were split into n = 13 teams.”

Source: Power, N., & Alison, L. (2017).  Journal of occupational and organizational psychology, 90(1), and available from this link (open access).

Making collaboration work – developing boundary work and boundary awareness in emergency exercises

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Lapwings/G.Griffin

“This study aims to investigate how boundary work is carried out at the incident site during exercises with police, ambulance and rescue services, and how boundary awareness is developed based on this boundary work. Collaboration in emergency work is challenging on many levels. The unforeseen and temporary nature of incidents presents basic challenges. Another important challenge is boundaries between specialised and autonomous emergency service organisations. Knowledge on how exercises are performed to increase the individuals’ and organisations’ preparedness for future joint-response work is relatively limited.”

Source: Andersson, A., & Lindström, B. (2017).  Journal of Workplace Learning, 29(4), and available from this link (subscription journal).

Preventing Dysfunction and Improving Policy Advice: The Role of Intra-Departmental Boundary Spanners

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Banksia

“It is well established in the public management literature that boundary spanners – people or groups that work across departments or sectors – are critical to the success of whole of government and joined-up working. In studying recent unprecedented change to central government agencies in the Australian context, our research identified that intra-departmental boundary spanners also play a critical role in the functioning of government departments, particularly during restructuring.”

Source: Carey, G., Buick, F., Pescud, M., & Malbon, E. (2017). Australian Journal of Public Administration, 76(2), and available from this link (subscription journal).

Whole of Government: the Solution to Managing Crises?

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“The frequency and severity of natural disasters has placed a clear emphasis on the role of governments in responding to these crises. During the past decade, disaster events have had a significant impact on the relevant communities as well as raising questions regarding the role of government and the bureaucratic coordination of planning and response processes. These events have placed a renewed focus on the ability of governments to plan, prepare, and respond in an effective way to crises. They have also tended to indicate that there remain serious challenges to government coordination and that crises create a unique series of challenges for the public sector.”

Source: Carayannopoulos, G. (2017). Australian Journal of Public Administration, 76(2), and available from this link (subscription journal).

How to design for large-scale multi-stakeholder co-creation initiatives: reframing crime prevention challenges with the police in Denmark

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“The police in Denmark have made a strategic intent to engage and activate external stakeholders in crime prevention efforts. However, knowledge of how to unfold the potential of such multi-stakeholder, co-creation-based business models is scarce. The current study was initiated to explore the roles of design thinking and strategic visualization in designing for multi-stakeholder, co-creation-based business models.”

Source: Degnegaard, R., Degnegaard, S., & Coughlan, P. (2015).  Journal of Design, Business & Society, and available from this link (open access).

 

Addressing challenges for future strategic-level emergency management: reframing, networking, and capacity-building

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Manly dawn/Griffin

“Drawing on the literature, a survey, and interviews and workshops with Australia’s senior emergency managers, this paper presents an analysis of five core challenges that these pressures are creating for strategic-level emergency management. It argues that emphasising ‘emergency management’ as a primary adaptation strategy is a retrograde step that ignores the importance of addressing socio-political drivers of vulnerabilities.”

Source: Bosomworth, K., Owen, C., & Curnin, S. (2017). Disasters, 41(2), and available from this link (open access).

Interagency Performance Targets: A Case Study of New Zealand’s Results Programme

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“New Zealand has been a beacon for government reforms for almost three decades. While the New Public Management Reforms of the late 1980s made agencies more efficient and responsive, they also created a new problem; agencies struggled to organize effectively around problems that crossed agency boundaries. New Zealand undertook a new round of reform in 2012 to address ten important and persistent crosscutting problems.”

Source: Scott, R. & Boyd, R. (2017). IBM Center for the Business of Government and available from this link (open access).

Developing and delivering a National Framework for Collaborative Police Action to Intimate Partner Violence in Canada

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Native fushia/PaperMonkey

“The National Framework for Collaborative Police Action to Intimate Partner Violence is a document designed to provide police services across Canada with a guide to leading practices to address intimate partner violence (IPV) and to help police leaders better inform policy development and subsequent police action. The National Framework espouses the importance of a multi-agency, multi-pronged collaborative model designed to keep individuals, families, and communities safe.”

Source: Gill, C., & Fitch, C. L. (2016).  Journal of Community Safety and Well-Being, 1(3), available from this link (open access).