Posts Categorised: Emergency Management

Women in fire and emergency leadership action plan

Manly/Flickr

“Of our 2,500 employees who hold fire and emergency roles, only 26 percent are women. The number of leadership roles held by women is just 19 percent. Participation in roles is skewed, with heavy biases in traditionally feminine and masculine roles. Women are more likely to perform non field-based roles, whereas men are more likely to undertake action-oriented operational roles. We are committing to 50 percent of fire and emergency roles and leadership roles being held by women.”

Source: Victoria. Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning (2016) and available from this link (open access).

Mental Disorder Symptoms among Public Safety Personnel in Canada

Surfing/Griffin

“Canadian public safety personnel (PSP; e.g., correctional workers, dispatchers, firefighters, paramedics, police officers) are exposed to potentially traumatic events as a function of their work. Such exposures contribute to the risk of developing clinically significant symptoms related to mental disorders. The current study was designed to provide estimates of mental disorder symptom frequencies and severities for Canadian PSP.”

Source: Carleton, R. N. et al. (2017).  The Canadian Journal of Psychiatry, and available from this link (open access).

Risk ownership framework for emergency management policy and practice

Collins Beach, Manly

“The purpose of this framework is to support better strategic management of risks associated with natural hazards. It does this through providing a series of tasks that support the allocation of risk ownership as part of strategic planning activities. This framework is not intended to replace current risk processes, but to enhance and add value to what is already there.”

Source: Young, C., Jones, R., Kumnick, M., Christopher, G. & Casey, N. (2017). Bushfire and Natural Hazards CRC and available from this link (open access)

Teaching emergency and disaster management in Australia: standards for higher education providers

Storm from North Head/Flickr

“Tertiary education plays a key role in developing the capability of those tasked with leading efforts to improve emergency and disaster management. A curricula informed by industry needs and designed with a generic benchmark in mind is essential for effective tertiary education. Therefore, there is value in developing standards for emergency and disaster tertiary programs; standards that may facilitate international cooperation and exchange among emergency and disaster professionals and perhaps contribute to professionalisation. The aim of this project was to develop a conceptual framework and standards for higher education programs in emergency and disaster management in Australia.”

Source: Fitzgerald, G., Rego, J., Ingham, V., Brooks, B., Cottrell, A., Manock, I., … & Crawley, H. (2017).  Australian Journal of Emergency Management, and available from this link (open access).

Coordination of federal, state and local disaster management arrangements in Australia: lessons from the UK and the US

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Lilly Pilly/PaperMonkey

“This document discusses the gaps in Australia’s emergency management legislation and the coordination of federal, state and local disaster management arrangements in Australia. It analyses key legislation from the UK and US jurisdictions and reveals important lessons that could be adopted in Australia.”

Source: Eburn, M. (2017). ASPI Insights and avilable from this link (open access).

Social media is changing the way society works

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Dusk

Carl Miller, Research Director at the Centre for the Analysis of Social Media, Demos speaks about how social media is changing the way society works and the emerging threats to public safety in a digital age.

Source: Miller, C. (2016). Police Foundation (YouTube 23:36) and available from this link (open access).

Improving the resilience of disaster management organizations through virtual communities of practice: A Delphi study

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Lilly Pilly/PaperMonkey

“A resilience-focused approach leads organizations to improve the management of disasters through being aware, flexible, trained, and prepared, having committed top managers and staff, and being part of a wider network of stakeholders. Based on the organizational resilience principles identified in the literature, this article analyses the potential for improvement of the organizational resilience of disaster management organizations through their involvement in virtual communities of practice (VCoPs).”

Source: Gimenez, R., Hernantes, J., Labaka, L., Hiltz, S. R., & Turoff, M. (2017). Journal of Contingencies and Crisis Management, and available from this link (subscription journal).

Offence or defence? Approach and avoid goals in the multi-agency emergency response to a simulated terrorism attack

Windsurfing

“When operating in multiteam settings, it is important that goals are cohesive between team members, especially in high-stakes, risky, and uncertain environments. This study explored goal consistency during a multiteam emergency response simulation. A total of n = 50 commanders from the UK Police Services, Fire and Rescue Services, and Ambulance Services took part in a simulated terrorism exercise, who were split into n = 13 teams.”

Source: Power, N., & Alison, L. (2017).  Journal of occupational and organizational psychology, 90(1), and available from this link (open access).

Making collaboration work – developing boundary work and boundary awareness in emergency exercises

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Lapwings/G.Griffin

“This study aims to investigate how boundary work is carried out at the incident site during exercises with police, ambulance and rescue services, and how boundary awareness is developed based on this boundary work. Collaboration in emergency work is challenging on many levels. The unforeseen and temporary nature of incidents presents basic challenges. Another important challenge is boundaries between specialised and autonomous emergency service organisations. Knowledge on how exercises are performed to increase the individuals’ and organisations’ preparedness for future joint-response work is relatively limited.”

Source: Andersson, A., & Lindström, B. (2017).  Journal of Workplace Learning, 29(4), and available from this link (subscription journal).

Using activity-based costing and simulation to reduce cost at a police communications centre

Coral Tree flower, Collins Beach

Coral Tree flower

“This study is based at a police force’s communications centre which undertakes a vital role in receiving and processing emergency and non-emergency telephone calls from the public and other agencies. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate a method for addressing the conflict between the need to reduce cost and the requirement to meet national standards in terms of a timely response to customer calls.”

Source: Greasley, A. & Smith, C. (2017). Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, 40/2, and available from this link (subscription journal).