Posts Categorised: Leadership

To Sound Like a Leader, Think About What You Say, and How and When You Say It

Fishing/Flickr

“Whether you are an associate manager or a senior executive, what you say, how you say it, when you say it, to whom you say it, and whether you say it in the proper context are critical components for tapping into your full strategic leadership potential. If you want to establish credibility and influence people, particularly when interacting with other executives or senior leadership, it’s important to be concise and let individuals know clearly what role you want them to play in the conversation. It’s also important to demystify the content of any message you deliver by avoiding jargon and being a person of few — but effective — words.”

Source: Shambaugh, R. (2017). Harvard Business Review and available from this link (open access, with personal registration).

Cultural change and lodestones in the British police

Collins Beach

“The purpose of this paper is to consider a challenge to an occupational jurisdiction in the British police. Historically, street cops have defended the importance of operational credibility as a way of sustaining the value of experience, and inhibiting attempts to introduce external leaders. This has generated a particular form of policing and leadership that is deemed by the British Government as inadequate to face the problems of the next decade.”

Source: Grint, K., Holt, C., & Neyroud, P. (2017). International Journal of Emergency Services, and available from this link (subscription journal).

Categories: Leadership, Police

Policing Around the Nation: Education, Philosophy and Practice

Manly/PaperMonkey

“One-third of police chiefs and sheriffs have a graduate degree, and one-third of sworn officers have a bachelor’s degree or higher, according to a new study from Cal State Fullerton’s Center for Public Policy and the Police Foundation.” The  study examined the role of higher education in policing and surveyed 958 law enforcement agencies from every state in the USA.

Source: Gardiner, C. (2017). Center for Public Policy and available from this link (open access).

 

Categories: Leadership, Learning, Police

The Overcommitted Organization

Grasses/Eva

“Over the past 15 years, we have studied collaboration in hundreds of teams, in settings as varied as professional services, oil and gas, high tech, and consumer goods. By carefully observing people during various stages of project-driven work, we have learned a tremendous amount about multi-teaming. In this article we discuss why it is so prevalent in today’s economy, examine the key problems that crop up for organizational and team leaders, and provide recommendations for how to solve them.”

Source: Mortensen, M & Gardner, H. (2017). Harvard Business Review, and available form this link (open access, with personal registration).

Bullying and Corporate Psychopaths at Work

Lichen/PaperMonkey

“Clive Boddy is a Professor of Leadership and Organizational Behavior at Middlesex University in England. For the past seven years, he has studied the evidence and effects of toxic leadership, and in particular the influence of the presence of corporate psychopaths on various workplace outcomes, including on levels of conflict and bullying at work.”

Source: Boddy, C. (2012). TEDxHanzeUniversity and available from this link [14:32 mins].  For more on bullying in the workplace go to AIPM Library.

Collaborative public management and systems thinking

IMG_5563

Lapwings/G.Griffin

“Public management and administration researchers need to integrate the scholarship on collaboration through systems thinking. How do we define collaboration? How do we distinguish among the categories of collaborative public management (CPM), collaborative governance (CG), and networks? How do systems and institutional context shape collaboration in these categories?”

Source: Amsler, L. B., & O’Leary, R. (2017). International Journal of Public Sector Management, and available from this link (subscription journal).

Women in fire and emergency leadership action plan

Manly/Flickr

“Of our 2,500 employees who hold fire and emergency roles, only 26 percent are women. The number of leadership roles held by women is just 19 percent. Participation in roles is skewed, with heavy biases in traditionally feminine and masculine roles. Women are more likely to perform non field-based roles, whereas men are more likely to undertake action-oriented operational roles. We are committing to 50 percent of fire and emergency roles and leadership roles being held by women.”

Source: Victoria. Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning (2016) and available from this link (open access).

It’s meaning making, stupid! Success of public leadership during flash crises

Flora

Grevillea

“Boin (2013) and others propose that public crisis leadership consists of several core tasks, among which crisis decision-making and meaning making stand out in “flash crises.” We however argue that successful leadership during a sudden crisis implies being visible and appealing to the public in need of hearing that the shattered world will be healed. When being visible and using the right rhetoric, public leaders are by and large automatically considered proficient crisis decision makers, that is “the right leader in the right place at the right time.”

Source: Helsloot, I., & Groenendaal, J. (2017). Journal of Contingencies and Crisis Management and available from this link (subscription journal).

A Strategic Leader’s Guide to Transforming Culture in Large Organizations

Manly Harbour/M. Hardy

“As the Department of Defense (DOD) transitions to a new administration, it will be accompanied by numerous editorials advocating for equipment modernization and changing our theater-specific postures. Many of these discussions will call for altering DOD’s current strategy. In essence, they will reiterate a dogmatic logic among the department’s leadership: the best way to solve a problem is to develop a new strategy. To succeed, we must realize that focusing mainly on strategy will cause us to overlook our greatest advantage—organizational culture.”

Source: Schmidt, M., & Slaughter, R. (2017). Joint Force Quarterly and available from this link (open access).

Why Everyone Should See Themselves as a Leader

Serene Manly dawn/Flickr

“Sue Ashford, a professor at the University of Michigan’s Ross School of Business, breaks down her decades of research on leadership—who achieves it, and how a group grants it. She explains that the world isn’t divided into leaders and followers. Instead, it’s a state that everyone can reach, whether they’re officially in charge or not. She also explains why shared leadership benefits a team and organization. Ashford offers tips on how to effectively grow leadership in yourself and your employees.”

Source: Ashford, S. (2017). HBR Ideacast (podcast 25 mins) and available from this link (open access).

Categories: Leadership