Posts Categorised: Policy

Podcast: Seeing the policy big picture

Shelly Beach/Flickr

“Anyone engaged in policymaking knows that it’s a complex business. But how often do policymakers take the time to think about the number of complex systems that have a bearing on their work? On the latest podcast, Helen Sullivan chats with Deborah Blackman, Claudia Pahl-Wostl, and Datu Buyung Agusdinata about how thinking about the science of systems can lead to better policymaking.”

Source: Policy Forum Pod and available from this link (open access).

 

 

Making sense of evidence: A guide to using evidence in policy

Grasses/Eva

“The handbook helps you take a structured approach to using evidence at every stage of the policy and programme development cycle. Whether you work for central or local government, or the community and voluntary sector, you’ll find advice to help you: understand different types and sources of evidence; know what you can learn from evidence; appraise evidence and rate its quality ; decide how to select and use evidence to the best effect; take into account different cultural values and knowledge systems; be transparent about how you’ve considered evidence in your policy development work.”

Source: Superu (NZ Govt) and available from this link (open access).

Doing Policy Differently

Collins Beach

“For the APS, it means being connectors, interpreters, and navigators. It may also mean being open to citizen juries. This requires a very different approach to collaboration from the traditional approach to policy. This different way of working may mean the APS sometimes plays more of a broker role as a strategic coordinator of policy inputs, and helping to ensure all inputs are fit for purpose, and, in part, to realise the best outcome for the public.”

Source: Presentation by Heather Smith, Secretary of Dept of Industry and Innovation and available from this link (open access).

Recipe for disaster: building policy on shaky ground

Native Daphne

“This report tallies the successes and failures of the post-earthquake recovery effort, so we can learn from both to do better next time. The most important way in which government can do better in the next disaster is by providing greater regulatory and policy certainty. Some of that requires better contingency planning before the event. We concur with the auditor-general that a recovery agency should have access to necessary “off the shelf” internal control and operational functions from Day 1. It should not have to develop them from scratch when the urgent and pressing needs are its external activities. Similarly, councils can incorporate disaster contingencies in their longterm plans.”

Source: Wilkinson, B., & Crampton, E.(2018). The New Zealand Initiative and available from this link (open access).

How can governments enable and support community-led disaster recovery?

Seagulls/Flickr

“This is a preliminary report of a continuing study. These results show the complex interplay between communities, governments, and community sector organisations in disaster recovery, and the varying expectations and experiences of those involved. These initial findings show potential to influence policies, processes and systems across governments and communities, and better support community-led recovery.”

Source: Owen, C. (2018). Australian Journal of Emergency Management and available from this link (open access).

A Federation of Clutter: The Bourgeoning Language of Vulnerability in Australian Policing Policies

Kookaburra/Griffin

“The policing of vulnerability has been under close scrutiny for over 30 years, with an increasing array of government and non-government services contributing their own areas of expertise to assist in solving these ‘wicked’ issues. Yet, the burgeoning lists of who constitutes a vulnerable person, and the haphazard and localised development of strategies, have left little room for policy and practice transfer across vulnerability attributes, let alone jurisdictions.”

Howes, L. M., Bartkowiak-Théron, I., & Asquith, N. L. (2017). In Policing Encounters with Vulnerability (pp. 89-117). Chapter available on request for AIPM students.

 

Categories: Police, Policy

How public inquiries can lead to change

Seagulls/Griffin

“To ensure public inquiries can lead to real change, the report calls for: government to systematically explain how it is responding to inquiry recommendations ; select committees to examine annual progress updates from government on the state of implementation ; public inquiries to publish interim reports in the months, rather than years, after events ; expert witnesses to be involved in developing the recommendations of inquiries.”

Source: Norris, E. & Shepheard, M. (2017). UK Institute for Government and available from this link (open access).

Working the Spaces in between: A Case Study of a Boundary-Spanning Model to Help Facilitate Cross-Sectoral Policy Work

Narrabeen duck/Griffin

“Since the 1990s, ‘joined-up government,’ ‘whole-of-government,’ and ‘horizontal governance’ approaches have emerged in many industrialized countries, resulting in the devolution of government functions to diverse policy networks. From these shifts, complex systems of networked actors have emerged, involved in designing, implementation, and influencing policy.”

Source: Carey, G., Landvogt, K., & Corrie, T. (2017).  Australian Journal of Public Administration and available from this link (subscription journal).

 

Wicked and less wicked problems: a typology and a contingency framework

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Sunbaking/T. Fuller

“This paper addresses shortcomings in the scholarship about ‘wicked problems’, and suggests ways of tackling them. Firstly, accounts of these problems tend to ‘totalise’, regarding them as intractable masses of complexity, so conflict-prone and/or intractable that they defy definition and solution. By contrast, we put forward a more nuanced analysis, arguing that complex problems vary in the extent of their wickedness, via such dimensions as their cognitive complexity or the diversity and irreconcilability of the actors or institutions involved. We propose a typology of different forms of wicked problems.”

Source: Alford, J., & Head, B. W. (2017). Policy and Society, and available from this link (open access).

To what extent do Canadian police professionals believe that their agencies are ‘Targeting, Testing, and Tracking’ new policing strategies and programs?

Gum tree/PaperMonkey

“Some researchers suggest that police professionals see little value in adopting evidence based approaches to tackle policing challenges. To examine this issue, 586 Canadian police professionals were surveyed. We explore responses to one particular question, which caused 353 respondents to reflect on whether they think their agencies enact evidence based policing (EBP) principles in daily operations; specifically, the principles of targeting, testing, and tracking the implementation of new policing strategies.”

Source: Huey, L., Blaskovits, B., Bennell, C., Kalyal, H. J., & Walker, T. (2017). Police Practice and Research, and available from this link (subscription journal).