Know it Now | Page 2 of 73 | Australian Institute of Police Management

Co-Production of Public Services in Australia: The Roles of Government Organisations and Co-Producers

Ducks/Griffin

“This article adds to the emerging empirical literature on citizen co-production. Based on a telephone survey of 1000 Australian adults, it replicates a five-country European study focusing on three policy domains: neighbourhood safety, environment, and health. It shows that individually performed and closely reciprocal activities with high levels of private value are performed the most often, whereas group activities producing mainly public value are the least performed.”

Source: Alford, J., & Yates, S. (2016).  Australian Journal of Public Administration, and available from this link (subscription journal)

State of the Service Report 2016-17

Manly early morning surf boat/M. Hardy

“The recently published 2016-17 State of the Service Report reveals that the APS is well positioned to embrace the changes and challenges of the future of work. Some significant changes are on the horizon, while others are already here. To respond to these changes and challenges, the APS is ensuring that people with the right skills are employed in the right way, in the right job at the right time. We are a diverse workforce and working towards levels of representation that mirror broader Australian society. We engage in innovative and collaborative activities and are seeking to better manage the performance of our people. Many of us have taken up flexible working arrangements.”

Source: Australian Public Service Commission and available from this link (open access).

To Sound Like a Leader, Think About What You Say, and How and When You Say It

Fishing/Flickr

“Whether you are an associate manager or a senior executive, what you say, how you say it, when you say it, to whom you say it, and whether you say it in the proper context are critical components for tapping into your full strategic leadership potential. If you want to establish credibility and influence people, particularly when interacting with other executives or senior leadership, it’s important to be concise and let individuals know clearly what role you want them to play in the conversation. It’s also important to demystify the content of any message you deliver by avoiding jargon and being a person of few — but effective — words.”

Source: Shambaugh, R. (2017). Harvard Business Review and available from this link (open access, with personal registration).

Innovative work behaviour in knowledge-intensive public sector organizations: the case of supervisors in the Netherlands fire services

Grevillea

“Studying innovative employee behaviours within knowledge-intensive public sector organizations (KIPSOs) might seem an odd thing to do given the lack of competitive pressures, the limited identification of the costs and benefits of innovative ideas and the lack of opportunities to incentivize employees financially. Nevertheless, KIPSOs require innovations to ensure long-term survival. To help achieve this goal, this paper explores the role of supervisors in supporting innovative work behaviour (IWB) by considering the unique challenges of KIPSOs and the conditions and characteristics of IWB in this context.”

Source: Bos-Nehles, A., Bondarouk, T., & Nijenhuis, K. (2017).  The International Journal of Human Resource Management, and available from this link (open access).

Missing persons: Who is at risk?

Trees and clouds/Flickr

“In 2008 the Australian Institute of Criminology (AIC) released a comprehensive study on missing persons in Australia, which presented national data on at-risk groups and identified best practice related to prevention, early intervention, referral processes and support services. This report followed an earlier AIC study that examined the incidence and impact of missing person events. The current study, commissioned by the National Missing Persons Coordination Centre (NMPCC) of the Australian Federal Police, updates missing person statistics and describes the extent to which known risk factors correlate with categories of missing persons.”

Source: Bricknall, S. (2017). Australian Institute of Criminology Research report and available from this link (open access).

Categories: Law Enforcement

Valuing different shades of blue: From diversity to inclusion and the challenge of harnessing difference

Manly beach/Flickr

“The purpose of this paper is to examine Australian efforts to promote gender equality in policing, suggesting that future police leaders will be confronted with the challenge of ensuring that their organisations are not only demographically diverse, but more importantly, that they are inclusive.”

Source: McLeod, A., & Herrington, V. (2017). International Journal of Emergency Services and available from this link (subscription journal).

Strategy in the Public and Private Sectors: Similarities, Differences and Changes

Lapwings/Griffin

“Strategic concepts and practices first evolved in the private sector, so they evoked much controversy when they migrated to the public sector from the late 1970s onwards. Partly this was about their (in)applicability to the distinctive features of government organizations, in particular their focus on public as well as private value, their situation in a political rather than a market environment, their almost exclusive capacity to use legal authority to achieve purposes, and the extent to which they often need to share power over personnel and resources with other public sector agencies.”

Alford, J.; Greve, C. (2017). Administrative Sciences, and available from this link (open access).

A ‘double edged sword’: discretion and compulsion in policing domestic violence

Manly/Eva

“Policing domestic violence is a complex area in which there are divergent views about the extent to which front line police action should be mandated by legislation and guidance. This study set in Victoria, Australia raised questions about the balance between discretion and compulsion in policing domestic violence through researching the implementation of the Code of Practice used to respond to domestic violence incidents.”

Source: Diemer, K., Ross, S., Humphreys, C., & Healey, L. (2017). Police Practice and Research, and available from this link (subscription journal).

 

Categories: Family Violence, Police

(Re)configuring the criminal justice response to human trafficking: a complex-systems perspective

Grevillea

“The multidimensional complexities associated with the criminal justice response to human trafficking are well documented. The transient and subversive nature of human trafficking as organised crime and the large number of multidisciplinary role-players involved in coordinating cross jurisdictional efforts to prevent, investigate and prosecute such cases, contribute to this complex undertaking. Complex systems theory suggests that a complex social problem such as human trafficking cannot be approached by using a linear or simplified lens, and requires a holistic perspective on the complex interactions between actors, and emergent behaviour in both the criminal justice system and the human trafficking system that it seeks to combat.”

Source: van der Watt, M., & van der Westhuizen, A. (2017). Police Practice and Research, and available from this link (subscription journal).

Cultural change and lodestones in the British police

Collins Beach

“The purpose of this paper is to consider a challenge to an occupational jurisdiction in the British police. Historically, street cops have defended the importance of operational credibility as a way of sustaining the value of experience, and inhibiting attempts to introduce external leaders. This has generated a particular form of policing and leadership that is deemed by the British Government as inadequate to face the problems of the next decade.”

Source: Grint, K., Holt, C., & Neyroud, P. (2017). International Journal of Emergency Services, and available from this link (subscription journal).

Categories: Leadership, Police