Know it Now | Page 3 of 73 | Australian Institute of Police Management

Proactive Policing: Effects on Crime and Communities

Native correa/Paper Monkey

“Proactive policing, as a strategic approach used by police agencies to prevent crime, is a relatively new phenomenon in the United States. It developed from a crisis in confidence in policing that began to emerge in the 1960s because of social unrest, rising crime rates, and growing skepticism regarding the effectiveness of standard approaches to policing. In response, beginning in the 1980s and 1990s, innovative police practices and policies that took a more proactive approach began to develop. This report uses the term “proactive policing” to refer to all policing strategies that have as one of their goals the prevention or reduction of crime and disorder and that are not reactive in terms of focusing primarily on uncovering ongoing crime or on investigating or responding to crimes once they have occurred.”

Source: National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (2017) and the ebook (336 pages) is available from this link (open access).

 

Tech Trends 2017: The Australian cut: The kinetic enterprise

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“The speed at which technology advances and upgrades can seem overwhelming. In the kinetic enterprise, the only constant is change. The 2017 report outlines how companies presently must sift through the promotional noise and hyperbole surrounding emerging technologies to find those solutions offering real potential. To realise that potential, they should become ‘kinetic’ organisations—companies with the dexterity and vision required to thrive amid ongoing technology-fueled disruption. While the report identifies key trends that will likely revolutionise enterprise technology in the next 18-24 months, the exponentials chapter looks even farther into the future, describing four key areas that blend science and applied technologies.”

Source: Deloitte and available from this link (open access, personal registration required).

 

Policing Around the Nation: Education, Philosophy and Practice

Manly/PaperMonkey

“One-third of police chiefs and sheriffs have a graduate degree, and one-third of sworn officers have a bachelor’s degree or higher, according to a new study from Cal State Fullerton’s Center for Public Policy and the Police Foundation.” The  study examined the role of higher education in policing and surveyed 958 law enforcement agencies from every state in the USA.

Source: Gardiner, C. (2017). Center for Public Policy and available from this link (open access).

 

Categories: Leadership, Learning, Police

Fast, smart and connected: How to build our digital future

Manly ferry/Flickr

“Professor Genevieve Bell outlines her proposal for how Australia should build its digital future. This talk was recorded in front of a live audience in Studio 22 at ABC Ultimo on Saturday 21 October, 2017, and features questions from former Boyer lecturer and sociologist Eva Cox and chief commissioner of the Greater Sydney Commission Lucy Turnbull.”

Source: Boyer lectures 2017 (part 4) and available from this link (open access). Podcast 60 mins.

Leveson five years on: the effect of the Leveson and Filkin Reports on relations between the Metropolitan Police and the national news media

Collins Beach/PaperMonkey

“The paper draws on interviews with senior Metropolitan Police officers, press officers and national crime journalists and argues that previous conclusions about asymmetrical relations favouring the police are partially problematic, with the media being in possession of key resources that often give them the upper hand. The paper also explores the role of new media in crime reporting and exposing police misconduct and suggests a new transfiguration may be emerging in police/media relations, allowing the media partially to bypass police sources.”

Source: Colbran, M. P. (2017).  British Journal of Criminology, and available from this link (subscription journal)

Categories: Media Relations, Police

We’ve stopped trusting institutions and started trusting strangers

NSW Police horses/Flickr

“Something profound is changing our concept of trust, says Rachel Botsman. While we used to place our trust in institutions like governments and banks, today we increasingly rely on others, often strangers, on platforms like Airbnb and Uber and through technologies like the blockchain. This new era of trust could bring with it a more transparent, inclusive and accountable society — if we get it right. Who do you trust?”

Source: Botsman, R. (2016). TED talk (17:05 minutes) and available from this link (open access). 

Why Performance Management Should Not Be Like Dieting

Cabbage Tree pool/Flickr

“This paper proposes lessons can be learnt from adopting the analogy of ‘dieting’. Short-term weight-loss practices can lead to a cyclical pattern that generates weight gain, rather than loss, in longer term. This occurs due to dieters following fads focused on short-term loss, rather than habitual modifications necessary for long-term weight change. This may explain why despite organisations pursuing the perfect employee performance management system (akin to dieting fads), they remain ineffective. We argue that compliance-based approaches encourage a short-term focus on completing the process (known pejoratively as ‘tick-and-flick’). However, where performance management is considered core business, more sustainable practices emerge.”

Source: Blackman, D., Buick, F., & O’Donnell, M. (2017). Australian Journal of Public Administration and available from this link (subscription journal).

Commuter Cops: Helping our police to live in the city they serve

Flannel flower/Flickr

“Half of the Metropolitan Police Officers do not live in London and this badly affects the way our city is policed. The phenomenon of the “commuter cop” makes it harder to deploy officers quickly in emergencies, such as riots or terrorist attacks; reduces the police presence in London; reduces officers’ contact with the communities they serve; and contributes to the Met’s continued difficulty in recruiting a force that reflects the diversity of London.”

Source: Gaskarth, G. (2016). Policy Exchange and available from this link (open access).

The concept and measurement of violence against women and men

Collins Beach/Flickr

“How should research and new ways of thinking about violence improve its measurement? Could improved measurement change policy? The book is a guide to how the measurement of violence can be best achieved. It shows how to make femicide, rape, domestic violence, and FGM visible in official statistics. It offers practical guidance on definitions, indicators and coordination mechanisms. It reflects on theoretical debates on ‘what is gender’, ‘what is violence’, and ‘the concept of coercive control’. and introduces the concept of ‘gender saturated context’. Analysing the socially constructed nature of statistics and the links between knowledge and power, it sets new standards and guidelines to influence the measurement of violence in the coming decades.”

Source: Walby, S. ert al. (2017). Policy Press and available from this link (open access).

From research outcome to agency change: mapping a learning trajectory of opportunities and challenges

Manly dawn/Griffin

“To create the best conditions for organisational learning a literature review of learning lessons in emergency management was conducted. Practitioners were also interviewed to understand the contexts and challenges faced in implementing research insights and in facilitating change. This paper presents two studies that examine aspects of organisational learning. In the first study, the challenges to learning from action and experience and from reflection and planning are examined. In the second study, the systems for learning used in emergency services organisations are considered and a preliminary theory of research utilisation maturity is proposed. The initiatives reported help to maximise the value of research and supports innovation through utilisation.”

Source: Owen, C., Krusel, N., Bearman, C., and Brooks, B. (2017) Australian Journal of Emergency Management and available from this link (open access).