Know it Now | Page 6 of 59 | Australian Institute of Police Management

Valuing different shades of blue: From diversity to inclusion and the challenge of harnessing difference

Manly beach/Flickr

“The purpose of this paper is to examine Australian efforts to promote gender equality in policing, suggesting that future police leaders will be confronted with the challenge of ensuring that their organisations are not only demographically diverse, but more importantly, that they are inclusive.”

Source: McLeod, A., & Herrington, V. (2017). International Journal of Emergency Services and available from this link (subscription journal).

Strategy in the Public and Private Sectors: Similarities, Differences and Changes

Lapwings/Griffin

“Strategic concepts and practices first evolved in the private sector, so they evoked much controversy when they migrated to the public sector from the late 1970s onwards. Partly this was about their (in)applicability to the distinctive features of government organizations, in particular their focus on public as well as private value, their situation in a political rather than a market environment, their almost exclusive capacity to use legal authority to achieve purposes, and the extent to which they often need to share power over personnel and resources with other public sector agencies.”

Alford, J.; Greve, C. (2017). Administrative Sciences, and available from this link (open access).

A ‘double edged sword’: discretion and compulsion in policing domestic violence

Manly/Eva

“Policing domestic violence is a complex area in which there are divergent views about the extent to which front line police action should be mandated by legislation and guidance. This study set in Victoria, Australia raised questions about the balance between discretion and compulsion in policing domestic violence through researching the implementation of the Code of Practice used to respond to domestic violence incidents.”

Source: Diemer, K., Ross, S., Humphreys, C., & Healey, L. (2017). Police Practice and Research, and available from this link (subscription journal).

 

Categories: Family Violence, Police

(Re)configuring the criminal justice response to human trafficking: a complex-systems perspective

Grevillea

“The multidimensional complexities associated with the criminal justice response to human trafficking are well documented. The transient and subversive nature of human trafficking as organised crime and the large number of multidisciplinary role-players involved in coordinating cross jurisdictional efforts to prevent, investigate and prosecute such cases, contribute to this complex undertaking. Complex systems theory suggests that a complex social problem such as human trafficking cannot be approached by using a linear or simplified lens, and requires a holistic perspective on the complex interactions between actors, and emergent behaviour in both the criminal justice system and the human trafficking system that it seeks to combat.”

Source: van der Watt, M., & van der Westhuizen, A. (2017). Police Practice and Research, and available from this link (subscription journal).

Cultural change and lodestones in the British police

Collins Beach

“The purpose of this paper is to consider a challenge to an occupational jurisdiction in the British police. Historically, street cops have defended the importance of operational credibility as a way of sustaining the value of experience, and inhibiting attempts to introduce external leaders. This has generated a particular form of policing and leadership that is deemed by the British Government as inadequate to face the problems of the next decade.”

Source: Grint, K., Holt, C., & Neyroud, P. (2017). International Journal of Emergency Services, and available from this link (subscription journal).

Categories: Leadership, Police

Proactive Policing: Effects on Crime and Communities

Native correa/Paper Monkey

“Proactive policing, as a strategic approach used by police agencies to prevent crime, is a relatively new phenomenon in the United States. It developed from a crisis in confidence in policing that began to emerge in the 1960s because of social unrest, rising crime rates, and growing skepticism regarding the effectiveness of standard approaches to policing. In response, beginning in the 1980s and 1990s, innovative police practices and policies that took a more proactive approach began to develop. This report uses the term “proactive policing” to refer to all policing strategies that have as one of their goals the prevention or reduction of crime and disorder and that are not reactive in terms of focusing primarily on uncovering ongoing crime or on investigating or responding to crimes once they have occurred.”

Source: National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (2017) and the ebook (336 pages) is available from this link (open access).

 

Tech Trends 2017: The Australian cut: The kinetic enterprise

Seagulls/Flickr

“The speed at which technology advances and upgrades can seem overwhelming. In the kinetic enterprise, the only constant is change. The 2017 report outlines how companies presently must sift through the promotional noise and hyperbole surrounding emerging technologies to find those solutions offering real potential. To realise that potential, they should become ‘kinetic’ organisations—companies with the dexterity and vision required to thrive amid ongoing technology-fueled disruption. While the report identifies key trends that will likely revolutionise enterprise technology in the next 18-24 months, the exponentials chapter looks even farther into the future, describing four key areas that blend science and applied technologies.”

Source: Deloitte and available from this link (open access, personal registration required).

 

Policing Around the Nation: Education, Philosophy and Practice

Manly/PaperMonkey

“One-third of police chiefs and sheriffs have a graduate degree, and one-third of sworn officers have a bachelor’s degree or higher, according to a new study from Cal State Fullerton’s Center for Public Policy and the Police Foundation.” The  study examined the role of higher education in policing and surveyed 958 law enforcement agencies from every state in the USA.

Source: Gardiner, C. (2017). Center for Public Policy and available from this link (open access).

 

Categories: Leadership, Learning, Police

Fast, smart and connected: How to build our digital future

Manly ferry/Flickr

“Professor Genevieve Bell outlines her proposal for how Australia should build its digital future. This talk was recorded in front of a live audience in Studio 22 at ABC Ultimo on Saturday 21 October, 2017, and features questions from former Boyer lecturer and sociologist Eva Cox and chief commissioner of the Greater Sydney Commission Lucy Turnbull.”

Source: Boyer lectures 2017 (part 4) and available from this link (open access). Podcast 60 mins.

Leveson five years on: the effect of the Leveson and Filkin Reports on relations between the Metropolitan Police and the national news media

Collins Beach/PaperMonkey

“The paper draws on interviews with senior Metropolitan Police officers, press officers and national crime journalists and argues that previous conclusions about asymmetrical relations favouring the police are partially problematic, with the media being in possession of key resources that often give them the upper hand. The paper also explores the role of new media in crime reporting and exposing police misconduct and suggests a new transfiguration may be emerging in police/media relations, allowing the media partially to bypass police sources.”

Source: Colbran, M. P. (2017).  British Journal of Criminology, and available from this link (subscription journal)

Categories: Media Relations, Police